Trust

In consultancy, we strive to achieve trusted adviser status – that is, building relationships where clients value and believe in our perspective and judgement to the extent they call us, rather than a competitor, related to issues even outside our scope of expertise. Frankly, this concept isn’t unique to consulting. Being a trusted adviser is a key to success in virtually any profession, particularly as someone moves into management and leadership roles. That’s why we believe in building high trust between our clients by giving them best services. When you approach your work with the goal of building a relationship rather than delivering a service or selling a product, the results will follow. One approach to creating camaraderie and connections is to find common interests. Humour and fun, non-work topics can be good ways to foster connections. The key is taking this to the next level – and women are often good at doing that.

Trust is our first priority when you come to us

Krone Consulting has worked a lot on “becoming a trusted adviser,” which typically covers tactics such as how to uncover and raise “unidentified” needs and then use communication and persuasion skills to convert those needs into business opportunities. Those are important skills, of course, but we won’t rehash those here. Rather, let’s highlight the less formulaic and more intuitive qualities that have helped us as become trustworthy for our clients worldwide.

It’s probably an overused metaphor, yes. But regardless of who you are, becoming a trusted adviser starts and ends with the ability to communicate genuinely. People want to know that you care about and value what they have to say. This – empathy – is one of women’s great strengths. Listening helps build a communication space that is accessible, comfortable, and easy for all discussions – even the challenging ones.

We believe in building trust with consultancy

Like most consultants, when it comes to making sure my client is heard. We make time for that. It is important to us that we seek to understand more often than we seek to be understood. We will never have a trust-based relationship if each of us is constantly preserving our own interest. When you approach your work with the goal of building a relationship rather than delivering a service or selling a product, the results will follow. One approach to creating camaraderie and connections is to find common interests.

We think about how my communication will be received.When we get around with a client, we give our full attention. And before moving forward with something, we reconfirm that we are on the same page with respect to what’s next. Whatever communication we have with someone in the present sets a foundation for future interactions. If it doesn’t feel like we are getting it (communication) right, we will raise it and do something about it.